Gallery / Mind Parasites

Mind Parasites

The conceptual cycle entitled, “Mind Parasites,” produced by British artist, Olga Lomaka, comprises twelve monumental paintings critically and methodically examining a whole range of issues affecting our globalized world. This body of work combines social critique with an exploration of psychological and scientific ideas. The artist’s chief goal is to explore the possibilities of purging one’s conscious mind of various ‘viruses’ and negative programming which dehumanize the population by subduing their will, destroying their personality, and turning them into zombies. These mental entities poison one’s consciousness by planting themselves into the psyche. Such negative invasion brings about a gradual dimming of consciousness, which in turn leads to disintegration of the physical body and fragmenting of the personality. Such workings may seriously affect an individual’s subsequent life and fate.

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Mind Parasites

The conceptual cycle entitled, “Mind Parasites,” produced by British artist, Olga Lomaka, comprises twelve monumental paintings critically and methodically examining a whole range of issues affecting our globalized world. This body of work combines social critique with an exploration of psychological and scientific ideas. The artist’s chief goal is to explore the possibilities of purging one’s conscious mind of various ‘viruses’ and negative programming which dehumanize the population by subduing their will, destroying their personality, and turning them into zombies. These mental entities poison one’s consciousness by planting themselves into the psyche. Such negative invasion brings about a gradual dimming of consciousness, which in turn leads to disintegration of the physical body and fragmenting of the personality. Such workings may seriously affect an individual’s subsequent life and fate.

What or who are these Mind Parasites? Is it the viral character of today’s mass culture which clutters our brains? Perhaps mass media induced mental states prompting people to act against their will and better judgment? Maybe some vicious mind games we have to endure? Possibly various uncritically accepted conspiracy theories? The artist provokes an avalanche of questions tumbling down upon the viewers’ heads as they confront her paintings.

As pointed out by art critic Julia Ostrovskaya, “expressive contrasting color palette; precise and confident brushstrokes; and whole carefully chosen compositions — all serve a certain artistic purpose. The manner of execution resembles that of a collage or stage designs. The exhibited cycle evokes snapshots from a psychological thriller. Each work transports the viewer into the innermost dimension of their psyche, revealing both the conscious and the unconscious responses of each person to each image.”

The key tonality of the project is simultaneously abstract and personal. As Olga maintains, “the paintings should elicit visualizations of the viewer’s own thoughts.” To paraphrase, the artist attempts to establish links between the “parasite symbols” in human consciousness through feelings and emotions of the viewer. The author probes into the inner world of a person by means of allegorical images. There, a forest stands for the brain (consciousness), trees indicate thoughts, and the protagonists act as symbols of “parasites” or “viruses.”

In no lesser degree, the artist is fascinated with the ongoing research on the human brain, its properties, and the scope of its possibilities. Her project is also some kind of a laboratory experiment, where the artist experiments with the perceptions of the viewer, and the viewer continues to experiment with and examine one’s own mental states. For Olga Lomaka, art is the process of searching for one’s true identity. She expressly states that her artistic process is not just a whimsical play of fancy, but something akin to the method of a contact improvisation. Hers are psychological, visual, and mental works propelling the viewers into an altered state of consciousness which leads them towards the insights and startling discoveries about themselves and the meaning of life. It probably will not be a mistake to state that her exhibition aspires to something comparable to that of group therapy. She believes that this is the best way to protest against mental and social ills afflicting modern society, and through this, to improve the existing order of things.

To master one’s own life with awareness, to understand oneself and world events better, to enter into a profound dialogue with one’s own inner self, while striving to fulfill one’s highest creative ideas and aspirations (as it is for their sake that we came into the world), is the ultimate mission of the artist’s project.